Last edited by Moogugis
Wednesday, July 8, 2020 | History

3 edition of commentary on the surviving plays of Aeschylus found in the catalog.

commentary on the surviving plays of Aeschylus

Rose, H. J.

commentary on the surviving plays of Aeschylus

by Rose, H. J.

  • 72 Want to read
  • 28 Currently reading

Published by Noord-Holland in Amsterdam .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Aeschylus.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby H.J. Rose. [Vol.2].
    SeriesVerhandelingen der Koninklijke Nederlandse Akademie van Wetenschappen, afd. Letterkunde. Nieuwe reeks -- deel 64, no.2
    ContributionsKoninklijke Nederlandse Akademie van Wetenschappen.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination299 p. ;
    Number of Pages299
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL20093279M

    This commentary offers a rich introduction and useful guide to the seven surviving plays attributed to Aeschylus. Though it may profitably be used with any translation of Aeschylus, the commentary is based on the acclaimed Chicago translations, The Complete Greek Tragedies, edited by David Grene and Richmond Lattimore. This commentary discusses Aeschylus' play Agamemnon ( BC), which is one of the most popular of the surviving ancient Greek tragedies, and is the first to be published in English since It is designed particularly to help students who are tackling Aeschylus in the original Greek.

      This commentary offers a rich introduction and useful guide to the seven surviving plays attributed to Aeschylus. Though it may profitably be used with any translation of Aeschylus, the commentary is based on the acclaimed Chicago translations, The Complete Greek Tragedies, edited by David Grene and Richmond Lattimore. James C. Hogan provides a general introduction to . Author: Aeschylus; Publisher: Univ of California Press ISBN: Category: Drama Page: View: DOWNLOAD NOW» The most famous series of ancient Greek plays, and the only surviving trilogy, is the Oresteia of Aeschylus, consisting of Agamemnon, Choephoroe, and .

    Persians, Seven against Thebes, and Suppliants - Ebook written by Aeschylus. Read this book using Google Play Books app on your PC, android, iOS devices. Download for offline reading, highlight, bookmark or take notes while you read Persians, Seven against Thebes, and Suppliants. All the other surviving plays of Aeschylus were almost certainly part of connected groups, although the Oresteia, composed of the extant Agamemnon, Libation Bearers, and Eumenides, is the only.


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Commentary on the surviving plays of Aeschylus by Rose, H. J. Download PDF EPUB FB2

Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Rose, H.J. (Herbert Jennings), Commentary on the surviving plays of. Get this from a library. A commentary on the surviving plays of Aeschylus / [Herbert J Rose].

This commentary offers a rich introduction and useful guide to the seven surviving plays attributed to Aeschylus. Though it may profitably be used with any translation of Aeschylus, the commentary is based on the acclaimed Chicago translations, The Complete Greek Tragedies, edited by David Grene and Richmond Lattimore.

James C. Hogan provides a general introduction to Aeschylean theater and. This commentary offers a rich introduction and useful guide to the seven surviving plays attributed to Aeschylus.

Though it may profitably be used with any translation of Aeschylus, the commentary is based on the acclaimed Chicago translations, The Complete Greek Tragedies, edited by David Grene and Richmond Lattimore. This commentary offers a rich introduction and useful guide to the seven surviving plays attributed to Aeschylus.

Though it may profitably be used with any translation of Aeschylus, the commentary is based on the acclaimed Chicago translations, The Complete Greek Tragedies, edited by David Grene and Richmond Complete Greek Tragedies. The Persae is the oldest of surviving plays and its subject matter is unique in ancient drama, since it is concerned with a recent historical event, the defeat of the Persians at Salamis; yet before the publication of this work inthere had been no edition suitable for university students and scholars.

This major edition - the first to be attempted on such a scale - incorporated much. Aeschylus - Aeschylus - The plays: One of a trilogy of unconnected tragedies presented in bc, Persians (Greek Persai) is unique among surviving tragedies in that it dramatizes recent history rather than events from the distant age of mythical heroes.

The play treats the decisive repulse of the Persians from Greece inin particular their defeat at the Battle of Salamis. This commentary discusses Aeschylus' play Agamemnon ( BC), which is one of the most popular of the surviving ancient Greek tragedies, and is the first to be published in English since Aeschylus' Persae, first produced in BC, is the oldest surviving Greek tragedy.

It is also the only extant Greek tragedy that deals, not with a mythological subject, but with an event of recent history, the Greek defeat of the Persians at Salamis in BC. Unlike Aeschylus' other surviving plays, it is apparently not part of a connected Format: Hardcover.

This commentary discusses Aeschylus' play Agamemnon ( BC), which is one of the most popular of the surviving ancient Greek tragedies, and is the first to be published in English since It is designed particularly to help students who are tackling Aeschylus in the original Greek for the first time, and includes a reprint of D.

Page's Oxford Classical Text of the play. A decent read. Prometheus Bound is one of the classics of Western Literature - and Vellacott's commentaries are pretty helpful in understanding the history and banckground of the plays, the life of Aeschylus, and pretty good translator notes.

If Greek plays are your cup of tea, this book is a decent and economical choice. Reexamining the surviving plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and Aristophanes, Graham Ley here discusses acting technique, scenery, the power and range of the chorus, the use of theatrical space, and parody in their plays.

Surviving Dramatic Works of Aeschylus The Suppliants. Probably the earliest surviving tragedy by Aeschylus and thus the earliest extant drama in western literature, it probably dates from around B.C., although there is some evidence to indicate that it.

The Persians (Ancient Greek: Πέρσαι, Persai, Latinised as Persae) is an ancient Greek tragedy written during the Classical period of Ancient Greece by the Greek tragedian is the second and only surviving part of a now otherwise lost trilogy that won the first prize at the dramatic competitions in Athens' City Dionysia festival in BC, with Pericles serving as choregos.

Condition: New. Paperback. This commentary discusses Aeschylus' play Agamemnon ( BC), which is one of the most popular of the surviving ancient Greek tragedies, and is the first to be published in English since ng may be from multiple locations in the US or from the UK, depending on stock availability.

pages. This commentary discusses Aeschylus' play Agamemnon ( B.C.), which is one of the most popular of the surviving ancient Greek tragedies, and is the first to be published in English since It is designed particularly to help students who are tackling Aeschylus in the original Greek for the first time, and includes a reprint of D.

Page Reviews: 3. “The Oresteia“ (comprising “Agamemnon”, “The Libation Bearers” and “The Eumenides”) is the only surviving example of a complete trilogy of ancient Greek plays (a fourth play, which would have been performed as a comic finale, a satyr play called “Proteus”, has not survived).

A Commentary on the Surviving Plays of Aeschylus, –8 Outline of Classical Literature for Students of English (London, ; reprint ) References [ edit ]. Sommerstein presents a freshly constituted text, with introduction and commentary, of Eumenides, the climactic play of the only surviving complete Greek tragic trilogy, the Oresteia of Aeschylus.

[Chapter titles are listed below.] Inthe publication of P. Oxy. changed our understanding of Suppliants’ place in Aeschylus’s s the other five of the six surviving definitely Aeschylean plays had confirmed dates for their productions (Persians inSeven inand the Oresteia in ), Suppliants had no secure date for its production, allowing speculation to.

Aeschylus’ Oresteia, the only surviving complete tragic Greek trilogy, consists of Agamemnn (Agamemnon), Chophoroi (Libation Bearers), and Eumenides. First produced in b.c.e., this trilogy.The Persae is the oldest of surviving plays and its subject matter is unique in ancient drama, since it is concerned with a recent historical event, the defeat of the Persians at Salamis; yet before the publication of this work inthere had been no edition suitable for university students and scholars.This commentary discusses Aeschylus' play Agamemnon ( BC), which is one of the most popular of the surviving ancient Greek tragedies, and is the first to be published in English since It is designed particularly to help students who are tackling Aeschylus in the original Greek for the first time, and includes a reprint of D.

L. Page's.